Context: Children are currently being removed from life and placed into an artificial environment learning largely irrelevant information to "prepare for life." They consume roughly $5,000. in tax money a year for this process and 100% of students leave school inadequately prepared for life, many with traumas suffered in school.

Goals:


  • Make what is learned ten times more relevant to life than the current curriculum.
  • Lower the cost of learning by half.
  • Integrate learning with "community contribution" so that students learn useful things by doing useful things for the community.
  • Create an appetite for life-long learning that is fun, profitable and leads to more engagement in life.
Principles:

  • Students learn more about life from living and engaging with the world as it is than a typical classroom.
  • Many students learn more from doing and integrating head-knowledge with hand knowledge.
  • Topics for learning should be chosen from the question: "How much sustainable well-being can I create for myself and others from learning this skill or doing this activity?"
  • Many students learn better one-on-one.
  • Many adults are healed by the energy, presence and innocence of a child and enjoy passing on their knowledge and gifts.
  • Children love to be valued, appreciated and feel useful and will learn and work harder when their learning makes people's lives better!
  • Healthy relationships become more sustainable the more life experiences are shared as a community.
Core Curriculum:

  • Sustainability in all forms:
  • Measuring the give and take relationship with the earth in various forms.
  • Measuring the cash-flow of a business and a bank account with mathematics and percentages.
  • Measuring the give and take of a sustainable friendship or romance or community.
  • Healthy Communication Practices:
  • Making clear requests.
  • Stating clear boundaries.
  • Speaking up when boundaries are crossed.
  • Asking others about their needs and boundaries.
  • Communicating our values, preferences and dreams.
  • Communicating needs.
  • Apologizing for mistakes.
  • Checking if you don't know how you affected someone.
  • Asking what you need to do to repair a mistake.
  • Making invitations.
  • Making clear win/win agreements.
  • Disengaging kindly and thoughtfully.
  • Engaging with government on all levels:
  • Protecting personal rights and freedoms.
  • Human rights and constitutional intentions.
  • Contacting all relevant government officials and introducing oneself.
  • Learning to protest something we don't agree with.
  • Learning to ask for something we want for the good of all.
  • Personal Health and Hygiene:
  • Learning basic first aid, where medical kits are, how to call for help and how to perform CPR.
  • Learning which ingredients are good for our body in personal-care products.
  • Learning to look up scientific papers and make informed decisions.
  • Learning to test for any food allergies and communicate them.
  • Learning which foods bring out the best in us.
  • Learning which vitamins and minerals support our well-being.
  • Studying chemicals and toxicities in the environment and how to be safe based on scientific literature.
  • Cooking:
  • Learning to cook a healthy lunch, breakfast and dinner we enjoy.
  • Learning to cook/prepare at least twelve dishes that many others enjoy.
  • Inventing at least one recipe of our own that we love and like to share.
  • Learning safety for putting out oil fires, turning off the stove, using timers and following recipes and expiration dates.
  • Sustainable Relationship with Money:
  • Opening a bank and savings account.
  • Learning to buy and use Bitcoin.
  • Learning to use Paypal.
  • Keeping money safe protocols, including:
  • Reporting a missing wallet or card.
  • Passwords on cell-phones.
  • Storing cash in a safe place.
  • Always investing in the future in savings and value-generating items.
  • How to perform a service for money.
  • How to make a product and sell it for money.
  • How to buy a product, combine it with something unique and sell it for more money.
  • How to do a cash-flow projection for a small business.
  • How to register a sole-proprietorship in your area.
  • How to ask a client for an online and/or written review and to be a reference.
  • How to write a legal contract.
  • History based on interest:​​​
  • Each ​child picks areas of life they are interested in.
  • By following these interests 200 years into the past they can see how things evolve.
  • Cultural Design:​​​
  • How to evaluate a culture's efficiency at creating well-being.
  • How to test a hypothesis on how to increase well-being.
  • How to brainstorm and propose changes to an existing culture.
  • Yoga: How to center and intimately relate to every muscle in the body over a weekly period.
  • Art: 
  • How to clay-model.
  • How to paint water-color.
  • How to paint oil.
  • How to draw.
  • How to use a computer tablet.
  • How to use photoshop or similar.
  • How to cast a bronze sculpture.
  • English:​
  • How to write a children's story.
  • How to write a diary.
  • How to write an article.
  • How to write a scientific paper.
  • How to spell/use a spell-checker.
  • How to hand-write upper and lower-case.
  • How to use grammar so others can understand.
  • How to make a speaking video.
  • How to listen effectively to another so they feel heard.
  • How to give an engaging speech.
  • How to Build a Personal Home:
  • How to weld.
  • How to do basic carpentry.
  • How to paint things.
  • Basic electricity.
  • Basic plumbing.
  • How to pour concrete.
  • How to preserve wood.
  • How to glue things.
  • How to test things for level.
  • How to measure square feet.
  • How to design a house that works.
  • How to Grow at least five different Foods:​
  • Composting organically.
  • Setting up irrigation automatically.
  • Watering by hand.
  • Transplanting plants.
  • Sowing seeds and growing them successfully to harvest.
  • Picking things at the right time.
  • Protecting them from animals.
  • Delegating care when busy or leaving town.
  • Looking at books and learning how/when to grow things.
  • How to Read:​
  • Using a computer program to read text.
  • Learning the alphabet and to speak it out loud.
  • Learning to read out loud.
  • Technology:​
  • How to ride a bicycle.
  • How to use the community app.
  • How to type on a phone and keyboard.
  • How to use a camera.
  • How to send e-mail and check-email.
  • How to configure a phone.
  • How to call people.
  • How to use headphones.
  • How to do a search for information.
  • How to buy something online.
  • How to create a personal account.
Protocols:

  • Each student picks a primary person in the community to be their contact person.
  • Most likely the person chosen receives a stipend, but may also teach in a way that the student can enrich their life.
  • Every day the student enters their learning into an app.
  • Everyone can review the lessons.
  • The core curriculum should advance yearly.
  • Students are celebrated for what they learn in monthly community events.
  • Students are encouraged to learn things by doing useful things.
  • A student can ask anyone to be their mentor and are taught how to approach a mentor for a win/win relationship in or outside the community via e-mail/letter.
  • Students send personal letters to all their public officials.
  • A student is primarily measured by the confidence and enthusiasm they have for being self-reliant and empowered to build their own home, start their own business and make a valuable contribution.
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